2016 True Nature

2016 True Nature

True Nature

The installation in this exhibition is concerned with representation; the reality of pictures, thoughts and ideas.
These works aim to be ”picture sculptures” which are simultaneously three dimensional objects and pictures
of things they represent. One can interpret the surface of the pieces as black-and-white brushstrokes, xeroxes
or prints that depict dry, partially burned or decomposed wood. The installation can also be seen as a picture of a
nature reserve or a forest in which some forest maintainence work has been carried out. The medium of the
pieces, ink and paper, refer to East Asian art in which depicting nature and its order occupy a central role.
The installation is a picture in which the idle wanderer can enter and walk through as they please. The exhibition
can also raise questions about our perceptions of the true state of nature contrasted to the romantic conception
many Finns have. The pieces in this exhibition remain ambivalent at several levels. They simultaneously are,
and are not, something. This might challenge the viewer, prone to either-or-thinking, to remain in midst of
several simultaneous perspectives.

Finally, the name of the exhibition True Nature referes to the Zen Buddhist concept of True Nature where all things
are seen to have a common, shared essence. In this view our isolated, self centered perspective of things is just
partial truth. One appears as many, many appears as one. According to Zen master Dōgen Kigen, only a picture of a
rice cake can truly satisfy hunger. In the end, the question remains, can the body of works in this exhibition
satisfy the call of nature?